Cultural History In Focus | "Gendered Objects: Embodiments of Colonial Collecting in Dutch New Guinea" by Anna-Karina Hermkens

 

Agus Ongge drawing Lake Sentani tapa design.
© Anna-Karina Hermkens

 
 

Gendered Objects

Embodiments of Colonial Collecting in Dutch New Guinea

by Anna-Karina Hermkens

 
 

This article was generously provided by Anna-Karina Hermkens.
Taylor & Francis have made the article accessible on their platform through the month of October.

 

Painted Bark Cloth | Maro | Lake Sentani
© Nationaal Museum van Wereldculturen | The Netherlands

Painted Bark Cloth | Maro | Lake Sentani
© The Dallas Museum of Art | Texas, USA

Painted Bark Cloth | Maro | Lake Sentani
© Nationaal Museum van Wereldculturen | The Netherlands

Painted Bark Cloth | Maro | Lake Sentani
© Nationaal Museum van Wereldculturen | The Netherlands

Painted Bark Cloth | Maro | Lake Sentani
© de Young Museum FAMSF | California, USA

 

© KITLV

© KITLV

 
 

Anna-Karina Hermkens

 
 
Art of the Ancestors Anna-Karina Hermkens
 

Dr. Anna-Karina Hermkens currently works at Macquarie University, Sydney. Her research covers Cultural Anthropology, Art and Anthropology, Historical Anthropology, Museum Studies, Gender Studies and Religious Studies/ Pilgrimage Studies. She has undertaken fieldwork in West Papua (Sentani area), the North Moluccas (Ternate), Papua New Guinea (Port Moresby, Madang, Collingwood Bay and Bougainville) and Solomon Islands (Guadalcanal-Marau area).

Using gender as an analytical tool to unravel issues of identity and power, her work has focused on the colonial collecting in West Papua; changing gender dynamics of barkcloth art among the Maisin people in Collingwood Bay; and the interplay between religious identity, ideology and violence/ conflict in Ternate and Papua New Guinea. Most recently, her work looks at the interplay between faith and eco-conflict (tensions surrounding logging and mining) in the Pacific.

 
 

Colophon

Author | © Anna-Karina Hermkens
Publication | Taylor & Francis
Date of Publication | June 21, 2007